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From the Director:

Dear IOOS Community,

Last week, we released the Ocean Enterprise 2015 - 2020 Report. The report takes a detailed look at the U.S. “Ocean Enterprise,” the businesses that support the blue economy as either providers of ocean observation and measurement technology or intermediaries who tailor ocean data and information to meet specific end-user needs. The report provides an update on the baseline study conducted in 2015, and gives insights into the growth and changing scope of the Ocean Enterprise over the last 5 years as this important industry cluster responds to the changing needs of the blue economy. 

IOOS is built on strong partnerships, including the private sector.  This report helps us recognize the full size and scope of the businesses with whom we can and should have collaborations as we seek to support the ocean observation and measurement needs of the future. 

Many thanks to the companies that participated in our survey, ERISS Corporation, Ralph Rayner for his leadership on this project, IOOS Staff Catie Tobin and Kate Culpepper for their contributions, and to those who helped review the draft document. Your help and support has been invaluable to the completion of this study.

This will be the last regular edition of the Eyes on the Ocean Newsletter for 2021. Keep an eye on your inboxes for a special holiday edition next week. The regular newsletter will be back in your inboxes in late January.

Thanks,
Carl

From the U.S. IOOS Office:

  • IOOS Releases 2015-2020 Ocean Enterprise Study Report: On December 7th, 2021, IOOS IOOS released the Ocean Enterprise 2015 - 2020 report.  We encourage you to visit our website to find the highlights and download the full text of the report. The report takes a detailed look at the U.S. “Ocean Enterprise,” the businesses that support the blue economy as either providers of ocean observation and measurement technology or intermediaries who tailor ocean data and information to meet specific end-user needs. The study shows significant growth in businesses that provide the technological means to observe and measure ocean dynamics. Called the Ocean Enterprise, this cluster of businesses, which provides essential support to the $2 trillion global Blue Economy and has revenues of $8 billion, saw a 60% growth of businesses—from 500 to 800—between 2015 and 2020. These businesses deliver essential information services to support sustainable use of ocean resources, understand Earth’s climate, and protect ocean health.The report provides an update on the baseline study conducted in 2015, and gives insights into the growth and changing scope of the Ocean Enterprise over the last 5 years as this important industry cluster responds to the changing needs of the blue economy. IOOS is built on strong partnerships, including those with the private sector.  This report helps us understand the scale and scope of the businesses with whom we can collaborate to advance all of our missions.  
  • HAB Observing Group Webinar: Emerging Data Science Tools for Managers and Scientists. The second installment in the Harmful Algal Bloom Observing Group webinar series took place on December 1st, 2021 with over 120 attendees. The webinar, titled "Emerging Data Science Tools for Managers and Scientists", focused on HAB data tools and presented three strategies for a HAB data portal - the WHOI HABHub, a community HAB Data Assembly Center (HABDAC) and the data portal for the HABScope. The featured panelists were Dr. Mike Brosnahan (WHOI), Rob Bochenek (Axiom Data Science), and Bob Currier (GCOOS, Texas A&M). The HAB OG's next webinar on "Making Community Science Work" will be March 16, 2022. Learn more about the HAB Observing Group at the IOOS Association’s National HAB Observing Page, and sign up to receive announcements about future webinars here.
  • From the IOOS Association: 
    • Caraid Award nominations now open: The IOOS Association has opened the nomination process for outstanding contributions to coastal and ocean observing. The IOOS Association created the Caraid Award in 2020 as an annual award to recognize those who have made outstanding contributions to observing and understanding our oceans, coasts and Great Lakes through vision, leadership, friendship and collaboration. Candidates can be an individual, a group, or an organization that has contributed to observing and understanding the oceans, coasts, and/or Great Lakes through collaboration, innovation, and/or a commitment to working with stakeholders. For more information and how to make your nomination, see the poster here

Observation Subsystem and Sensor Technologies:

  • Surface Current Mapping: (IOOS Surface Currents Program Manager, Brian Zelenke, brian.zelenke@noaa.gov):  
    • No update.

Marine Life - Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) (IOOS PO POC Gabrielle Canonico, Gabrielle.Canonico@noaa.gov) and Animal Telemetry Network (ATN) (National Coordinator Bill Woodward, Bill.Woodward@noaa.gov):

  • LAST CHANCE! Funding Opportunity! FY2022 US Marine Life Observations: Coordinated Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) and Animal Telemetry Network (ATN) Activities to Ensure Resilient, Productive Ecosystems and Human Communities in the Face of Change: On behalf of the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP), NOAA and partner agencies, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the Office of Naval Research request proposals that: (1) build upon the foundation established by the US Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON), the US Animal Telemetry Network (ATN), and the US IOOS Regional Associations to work across sectors and disciplines towards an integrated, sustained marine life observing capability for the U.S. ocean, coasts and Great Lakes, from estuaries to the deep ocean; (2) advance technologies for efficient and/or automated collection of species and associated habitat observations; (3) enable open access to biodiversity data and information; and (4) utilize these observations, technologies, and data to address place-based (e.g., sanctuaries, reserves, protected areas, leasing blocks, etc) management, conservation and restoration needs. For more information and to apply: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=335886. The deadline for applications is December 17, 2021.

Data Management and Cyberinfrastructure (DMAC) Subsystem and Tools Built on IOOS data (DMAC System Architect Micah Wengren and IOOS Data Management leads: data.ioos@noaa.gov, or the 'ioos_tech' listserve: https://groups.google.com/g/ioos_tech):

  • SAVE THE DATE: 2022 DMAC Code Sprint April 26-28, Chicago: We're pleased to announce that IOOS plans to host the 2022 DMAC Code Sprint in Chicago with our partner GLOS! Save the dates of April 26 - 28, 2022 for the second DMAC community code sprint. We're tentatively planning to host an in person event in Chicago, with the option for virtual participation for those who are unable to travel to be there in person. We'll be reaching out in the near future with more details about meeting logistics, sprint/activity planning, technologies we hope to use for the virtual component of the sprint, and all the rest. If you have any suggestions or input about the sprint, please post them in the #dmac channel in the IOOS Slack - https://ioos.slack.com. Use this link to join our Slack workspace.  As we did two years ago, we expect to use Slack heavily during the sprint.  

  • QARTOD (National Coordinator Mark Bushnell, mark.bushnell@noaa.gov):
    • QARTOD 2022-2026 Work Plan: We continue drafting the QARTOD 2022-2026 work plan - reviews and comments are still being received from members of the Board of Advisors. The draft plan will be edited to address their suggestions, and that will be followed by a review invitation to a broader audience. We welcome your thoughts about our intentions to expand the scope of QARTOD to make it relevant to a broader range of communities.
    • Ocean Best Practice System: The OBPS Steering Group (https://www.oceanbestpractices.org/about/governance/) held their third annual meeting virtually during 7-9 December 2021. Meeting objectives included reviews of the OPBS status, adequacy of services provided, methods to improve community awareness, and change to the governance structure.

Modeling and Analysis Subsystem (IOOS PO and IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed (COMT) POC – Tracy Fanara, Tracy.Fanara@noaa.gov):   

  • No update.

Interagency and International Collaboration/News:

  • UN Decade of Ocean Science For Sustainable Development Updates: 
    • Fifteen experts appointed to new Decade Advisory Board: The fifteen experts selected by UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), the UN body tasked with coordinating the Ocean Decade, come from government, private sector, philanthropy, civil society, and the scientific community. Hailing from 13 countries, they will serve on the Decade Advisory Board in their individual capacities, for a period of two years. Read more here: https://www.oceandecade.org/news/ocean-decade-fifteen-experts-appointed-to-new-decade-advisory-board/ 
    • Pre-Announcement Joint Call for Proposals on Underwater Noise in the Marine Environment: The overall aim of the call on Underwater Noise in the Marine Environment is to decrease the existing high levels of uncertainty and to promote specific lines of research that will contribute to the implementation of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) at regional sub-basin scale, and, therewith, contributing to reach the Good Environmental Status (GES) of the European seas and oceans. The call will address two main challenges in the field through activities that may focus on:
      • Call Announcement: The call on Underwater Noise will be published on the website of the JPI Oceans and the respective funding agencies on December 20, 2021. The submission tool will open thereafter.
      • Submission Deadline: The deadline for submitting proposals is February 28, 2022, 15:00 CET. Applications received after the deadline will not be considered.
      • Tentative Start date of projects: Upon approval of funding by their respective national FUNDING PARTNER, project consortia should be starting no later than end of the year 2022.
    • Regional Kick-off Conference for the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development 2021–2030 for the Tropical Americas Region (16–17 December 2021): The Regional Kick-Off Conference, to Launch the Ocean Science Decade in the Tropical Americas will take place on Thursday and Friday December 16 and 17.  On Thursday the 16th, participants will have an opportunity to learn about the proposed regional Actions and make further suggestions. On Friday the 17th, the activity will focus on highlighting emerging regional partnerships which will facilitate the implementation of the proposed actions. Register here: http://iocaribe.ioc-unesco.org/rkoc/regrkoc 
  • GEBCO Guiding Committee is calling for nominations: The Global Bathymetry Chart (GEBCO) is calling for nominations to fill a vacant seat in its Guiding Committee. Under the auspices of International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO, GEBCO operates through largely voluntary contributions of an enthusiastic international team of geoscientists and hydrographers, and its work is directed by a Guiding Committee. The Guiding Committee includes five members appointed by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) and five members appointed by the IOC for a five-year term, renewable once. One IOC-appointed seat will become vacant in 2022 and a call for nominations is therefore underway to fill that seat. Read more here: https://ioc.unesco.org/news/guiding-global-ocean-mapping-efforts-call-nominations-gebco-guiding-committee 
  • TODAY! National Science Foundation Webinar: Join NSF for this live event! December 16, 2021, 07:00 PM EST - Chat With Researchers Aboard an Antarctic Icebreaker: Join oceanographer and IOOS Advisory Committee member Oscar Schofield as he chats with researchers aboard the Research Vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer as they study the marine ecosystems of the West Antarctic Peninsula. Their research, part of the National Science Foundation’s Long-Term Ecological Research program, catalogs the effects of climate change on the environment around the Antarctic Peninsula, one of the fastest-warming regions on Earth. In this live Zoom event, learn how the Antarctic Peninsula has changed over the past several decades and how these changes affect life at every level of the food web, from tiny crustaceans to penguins, seals and whales. Registration: https://nsf.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_h5TX11w8TIiZ4wwW_GNTTQ 
  • Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) News:
    • OOI Data System User Survey: Opportunity to Provide Feedback: The OOIFB Data Systems Committee needs your help in evaluating new Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) data systems. In 2019 the OOI Facility Board’s Data Systems Committee (DSC) conducted a survey to learn how the OOI could better serve data to users. In response to the feedback received, the OOI program developed the Data Explorer, a refined and more capable interface for finding and accessing data. Now, the DSC is interested to hear your thoughts on this new data system, as well as the other available systems, and to uncover potential ways of improving data access for users. Read more here: https://oceanobservatories.org/2021/12/ooi-data-system-user-survey-opportunity-to-provide-feedback/ 
    • Regional Cabled Array Recording Swarm of Earthquakes in Real Time: On December 7, 2021 a swarm of earthquakes began on the Blanco Transform Fault, a major plate boundary at the southern end of the Juan de Fuca Plate. The ongoing seismic swarm is being tracked live by the National Science Foundation’s underwater observatory, the Regional Cabled Array (RCA). The RCA is a component of NSF’s Ocean Observatories Initiative and is operated and maintained by the University of Washington. It includes ~900 km of high power and high bandwidth submarine fiber optic cables that stretch from Pacific City, OR out to the most active volcano off the coast “Axial Seamount” that erupted in 1998, 2011 and again in 2015. A second cable heads south along the Cascadia Subduction Zone and turns east along the Cascadia Margin off Newport, OR. Over 150 instruments on the seafloor and on instrumented moorings provide real-time data flow to shore at the speed of light. A suite of seismometers at the summit of Axial Seamount lit up on December 7, 2021 as the seismic swarm began along the Blanco. This live feed was developed by the UW Applied Physics Laboratory. Read more here: https://oceanobservatories.org/2021/12/rca-recording-swarm-of-earthquakes-in-real-time/ 
  • National Sea Grant Advisory Board Seeking Nominations: The National Sea Grant Office is accepting nominations for the National Sea Grant Advisory Board.  To be considered, please submit the name of the nominee, a CV, resume or detailed bio, and their area of expertise. While nominations are always accepted, to be considered for current openings, please submit your nomination no later than January 31, 2022. Please submit candidate nominations to Susan Holmes via email: oar.sg-feedback@noaa.gov. Current needs for committee members include expertise in coastal management, social and behavioral sciences, state government, and tribal and/or indigenous knowledge holders. The Advisory Board is also looking for regional expertise in the Great Lakes and U.S. Caribbean. 
  • CO-OPS Completes Currents Survey of Delaware Bay, River: Field operations are complete for the tidal currents survey of the Delaware Bay and River. The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services’ (CO-OPS) National Current Observation Program deployed 34 current meter stations to measure tidal currents every six minutes over an average of 55 days per station. Five stations were equipped with conductivity, temperature, and depth sensors to capture salinity and temperature data. The survey spanned from the mouth of the bay up the river to just south of Trenton, New Jersey. Measurements will be used to update NOAA's Tidal Current Predictions and validate the Delaware Bay Operational Forecast System. Observations also support partners at the U.S. Geological Survey as they develop and validate a new model of the Delaware Bay.
  • NOAA Launches Second Marine Channels Forecast System: This week, NOAA launched the Mobile Bay Marine Channels Forecast, a collaborative tool that centralizes all of the region’s available meteorological and oceanographic forecasts into one place. Mobile Bay’s system is the second of its kind in the U.S., and will fully integrate wind, wave, rain, and visibility forecasts issued by the National Weather Service (NWS) with NOS’s water level and current forecasting guidance. Vessel operators can use the system alongside real-time observations to safely navigate busy shipping channels in Mobile Bay. Forecasts will be available at 19 locations in the seaport along with real-time observations generated by NWS and the NOS Mobile Bay Physical Oceanographic Real-time System (PORTS®).
  • NGS Chairs International Surveying Working Group Meeting: THe National Geodetic Survey (NGS) chaired and participated in a joint working group meeting of the International Association of Geodesy and International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service. The working group focuses on site surveys and co-location. Colleagues from Australia, France, Germany, Spain, and Sweden attended, as did other U.S. surveying colleagues. This group represents field surveyors involved in measuring vectors between various space-observing instruments at observatories. Participants shared information on recent and upcoming local tie surveys, and on how surveyors can improve their techniques, increase the sharing of research endeavors, and develop new strategies for emerging topics.
  • OCS Presents at Intracoastal Waterway Association Meeting: OCS personnel presented at the annual meetingfor the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Association in Jacksonville, Florida. The association comprises tug companies, recreational boaters, ship yards, local governments, and others interested in a well-maintained and safe Intercoastal Waterway. OCS presented on navigation response team capabilities, relevant survey projects, coordination with federal partners, and updates to the nautical charting system. Attending this meeting also provided critical opportunities to identify potential external source datasets and to reinforce the message that mariners should no longer be relying on the raster nautical chart.

Delivering the Benefits:

  • IFCB Wave Buoy Monterey Bay Deployment: CeNCOOS and SCCOOS have collaborated with MBARI to install an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB) on their Wave-power Buoy deployed offshore near the mouth of Monterey Bay. The robotic microscope samples sea water every hour and, using lasers and a microscope camera, photographs individual plankton cells and transmits the images via satellite to the web. Image-recognition software and machine learning identifies and counts the phytoplankton cells, flagging species that can produce toxins and lead to harmful algal blooms (HABs). This deployment is part of an expansion of the IFCB data network funded by the state and managed by CeNCOOS and SCCOOS. Read this story and much more in the CeNCOOS newsletter.
  • New Puget Sound Metrics Dashboard: To help track water property changes that may have ecological impacts in Puget Sound, several UW scientists developed a dashboard of five metrics using regional real-time environmental measurements. The metrics go beyond simply reporting observations by also placing them in a historical context and giving insight as to what factors may be causing the observed change. This project was funded by the Puget Sound Partnership.
  • Installing Web Cameras in the Community as part of WebCOOS: Currituck County, North Carolina will be one of the first U.S. coastal communities to install web cameras as part of the SECOORA led program Webcams for Coastal Observations and Operational Support WebCOOS. This project is utilizing coastal web cameras for quantitative scientific analysis, public safety, and resource management for coastal municipalities and is funded by the NOAA. Read the full story here. 
  • New papers & reports:

Congressional:

  • No update.

Communications/Outreach/Education:

  • NANOOS kicks off NSF Accelerator-funded project to Improve Ocean Data Access for Indigenous Coastal Communities: Through a new project funded by the National Science Foundation’s Convergence Acceleratorprogram, NANOOS is collaborating with partners to get wave data into the hands of communities in a way that takes advantage of existing, lower cost wave buoy technology and enables sustained community-led stewardship of the buoys. NANOOS will partner with the Quiluete Tribe and Quinault Indian Nation who have long requested wave data off their ancestral harbors. Using co-design, the team aims to revolutionize the status quo by providing new tools and new connections that will focus on the hyper-local scale. This project brings three U.S. IOOS Regional Associations (NANOOS, PacIOOS, and AOOS) working with Indigenous partners in their regions together with Sofar Ocean, a lower-cost buoy and sensor company, to improve access to ocean data for coastal communities. The co-designed approach aligns well with the focus of NSF’s Convergence Accelerator: advancing use-inspired solutions into practical application to address large-scale societal challenges at a faster pace.

Upcoming Meetings with IOOS Participation (Please check links as we move forward as things may change quickly for planned events):

  • ESIP Virtual January Meeting (Jan 18-21). For over 20 years, ESIP meetings have brought together the most innovative thinkers and leaders around Earth science data, thus forming a community dedicated to making Earth science data more discoverable, accessible and useful to researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and the public. The theme of this year’s meeting is "Data for All People: From Generation to Use and Understanding." More information about the meeting can be found here: https://2022esipjanuarymeeting.sched.com/info 
  • AMS Annual Meeting, 23-27 January 2022, Houston Texas: Abstract submission for the 102nd American Meteorological Society’s Annual Meeting, 23–27 January 2022, Houston, Texas is open. Submissions close 1 September 2021. See https://annual.ametsoc.org/index.cfm/2022/call-for-papers/. Contact Tiffany Vance for more details.  
    • Cloud Computing for Big Data in Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate (Joint with 21st Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Environmental Science, 12th Symposium on Advances in Modeling and Analysis Using Python, and  the Eighth Symposium on High Performance Computing for Weather, Water, and Climate)
    • Developing Cloud-based Tools for Data Analysis and Archiving  (Joint with 21st Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Environmental Science, 12th Symposium on Advances in Modeling and Analysis Using Python, and  the Eighth Symposium on High Performance Computing for Weather, Water, and Climate) 
    • FAIR and Open Data and Software within the Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences to Support  Replicable Research and Reusable Tools for Climate Analysis  (Joint with 25th Conference of  Atmospheric Librarians International and the 12th Symposium on Advances in Modeling and Analysis Using Python)
    • Meeting Data Stewardships Needs for Heterogeneous Earth and Atmospheric Science Data via the Exploitation of Emerging Technologies   (Joint with 25th Conference of Atmospheric Librarians International and the 21st Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Environmental Science).
    • Sessions in the 38th Environmental Information Processing Systems (EIPT) Conference that might be of particular interest include:
  • Ocean Sciences Meeting 2022, Feb 27 - March 4, Virtual: This year’s theme emphasizes the importance of working together. “Come Together and Connect,” focuses on strengthening the ocean sciences community through discussing both basic and applied research while making scientific and social connections. https://www.aslo.org/osm2022/ 
    • Tiffany Vance and Tim Kearns [GLOS] are co-organizers for a session at the 2022 Ocean Sciences meeting entitled “IoT and Distributed Sensing in Ocean Science and Research” under the Ocean Technologies and Observatories topic.  
    • Tiffany Vance is a co-organizer of a session at the 2022 Ocean Sciences meeting entitled “Democratizing Data: Environmental Data Access and its Future” in the  Education & Outreach topic.
  • NANOOS Community Workshop - Save the Date - March 24-25, 2022: We are pleased to announce that NANOOS is planning a community workshop on March 24-25, 2022 in Astoria, OR. Please mark your calendars! Our goals are to galvanize Pacific Northwest users and stakeholders, connect with old and new partners, and forge new strategies. We want to hear directly from our users about what would strengthen NANOOS products and how to reach broader audiences. This is an opportunity to bring together industries, policymakers, scientists, data experts, tribes, and other interested parties in the region to interact with each other and refine the NANOOS vision. More details will be available soon, please let us know if you have any questions or workshop topic suggestions.
  • SAVE THE DATE! 2020 DMAC Code Sprint April 26-28, Chicago: We're pleased to announce that IOOS plans to host the 2022 DMAC Code Sprint in Chicago with our partner GLOS! Save the dates of April 26 - 28, 2022 for the second DMAC community code sprint. We're tentatively planning to host an in person event in Chicago, with the option for virtual participation for those who are unable to travel to be there in person. We'll be reaching out in the near future with more details about meeting logistics, sprint/activity planning, technologies we hope to use for the virtual component of the sprint, and all the rest. If you have any suggestions or input about the sprint, please post them in the #dmac channel in the IOOS Slack. Use this link to join our Slack workspace.  As we did two years ago, we expect to use Slack heavily during the sprint. 
  • SAVE THE DATE! 2022 GLOS Annual Meeting, 28 April 2022, Chicago & virtual: Join GLOS at the Pendry Hotel or virtually to hear the latest from GLOS staff, board, and IOOS leadership on what we have accomplished in the last year, and where we’re heading in the near future. Then, be part of the official Seagull launch party, when the platform will move out of its Beta phase and be ready for everyone to use region-wide! Registration and more information coming soon.
      • GlobalHAB Workshop: Modeling and Prediction of Harmful Algal Blooms, 9 - 13 May 2022, Glasgow, UK:This 4-day workshop will combine oral and poster presentations, round-table discussions, and tutorials in order to 1) increase awareness of the range of modelling and observational tools that are in our community toolbox (or should be); 2) help the HAB community speak with one voice regarding climate-change impacts on the global ocean; and 3) help scientists and technologists develop creative approaches to meeting the needs of coastal communities, governments, and industry worldwide. Sessions will include
        • Regional problem-solving: linking models, observations, and stakeholder needs
        • Emerging approaches and technologies: physical and ecological model methods and observational capacities that open up new directions in HAB prediction
        • Global patterns and global change: links between HABs and environmental drivers at large spatial scales and on long time horizons
        • Scalable solutions: applications of global models, remote sensing, and other communal resources to predicting HABs and managing their impacts in data- and resource-poor systems

A priority for this workshop is inclusivity and balance in terms of national origin and career stage. We are able to waive registration fees and cover travel costs for a number of participants in support of this goal. Since the workshop is focused on discussion and small-group, informal interaction, it will not be possible to join it remotely, but we hope to make a number of presentations and other resources freely available online afterwards.  Abstract submission is open now through November 14.  A companion webinar series is running monthly during the second half of 2021, please click here for information and free registration

        • RESCHEDULED! MTS 14th Buoy Workshop, September 19-22, 2022, Wilmington, NC: The MTS 14th Buoy Workshop has been rescheduled for October 25 – 27, 2021 and will be held in Wilmington, North Carolina.  This year’s theme is Moored Systems for the Future. Areas and topics will include, but are not limited to: Ecosystems Monitoring, Long-Term Observing Systems, Reliability & Harsh Environments, Power Systems, Data, Sensors & Instrumentation, Mooring Design and Synergy.  Registration opens and the call for speakers begins April 15, 2021, and abstracts are due September 1, 2021. Please see the Buoy Workshop homepage for more information.

 

Other Upcoming Meetings:

        • Abstract Deadline Extended! International Ocean Data Conference 2022: The Data We Need for the Ocean We Want, 14-16 February 2022, Sopot, Poland & virtual: The conference will be held as a hybrid event with a number of participants on-site while others will participate through video conference. The conference programme includes the following topic areas: Global Strategies and Policy, Implementing the Digital Commons, and Looking Forward. Learn more on the conference website
        • MTS TechSurge: Florida Estuary and Coastal Monitoring - Looking Ahead to 2030 - 12-14 April 2022: Join us for a TechSurge event with focus on transformative solutions for integrated coastal monitoring systems for Florida's estuaries and nearshore coastal waters. We welcome your revolutionary new technologies and system designs or those that can be adapted for coastal monitoring from other uses for significant impact in this focus area. Help meet the grand challenges and opportunities and guide the development for the future. In addition, guidance and outcomes from this meeting will directly influence Indian River Lagoon monitoring network planning and may feed into the Ocean Decade Implementation Plan (2021-2030).
          • WHEN: April 12 - 14, 2022
          • WHERE: FAU Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute (FAU/HBOI), Fort Pierce, Florida
          • Registration Information - Registration will open Tuesday, October 12, 2021
          • More info: https://mtsociety.memberclicks.net/fl-techsurge 
        • 5th International Marine Protected Areas Congress (IMPAC5), 23 - 30 June 2022, Vancouver, Canada: From 23-30 June 2022, the world’s leading ocean conservation professionals will meet in Vancouver, Canada to chart a course towards protecting 30% of the global ocean by 2030. The call for proposals for the Congress program is open now until 20 September (23:59 PDT) 2021. For more information, see https://www.impac5.ca/congress-details/program/proposals/ 
        • Open Science Conference on EBUS: Past, Present and Future’ and the Second International Conference on the Humboldt Current System - 19-23 September 2022: The Open Science Conference on Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS): Past, Present and Future and the Second International Conference on the Humboldt Current System are planned for September 19 - 23 in Lima, Peru. The meeting will bring together PhD students, early career scientists and world experts to understand, review, and synthesize what is known about dynamics, sensitivity, vulnerability and resilience of Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems and their living resources to climate variability, change and extreme events. The international community (researchers, scientific programs or projects, etc.) is invited to submit session proposals for the programme of the conference. Deadline for submission: 15 December 2021. The announcement of the final sessions will be issued on February 1st, 2022.

 

Webinars:

      • SERIES: National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Series: The National Marine Sanctuaries Webinar Seriesprovides educators with educational and scientific expertise, resources, and training to support ocean and climate literacy in the classroom. This series currently targets formal and informal educators, students (high school through college), as well as members of the community, including families. You can also visit the archives of the webinar series to catch up on presentations you may have missed here.
      • SERIES: EMB Third Thursday Science: The European Marine Board’s webinar series, #ThirdThursdayScience, focuses on the science underpinning the research and policy recommendations in EMB publications. The free webinars will take place on the third Thursday of each month, and will run for one hour between 13:00 - 14:00 CEST. Webinars will also be live-streamed on YouTube and will be made available to re-watch later on the EMB YouTube Channel. Upcoming webinars:
        • 16 December: Marine Geohazards in Europe

Grants and Funding Opportunities:

  • FY2022 US Marine Life Observations: Coordinated Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) and Animal Telemetry Network (ATN) Activities to Ensure Resilient, Productive Ecosystems and Human Communities in the Face of Change: On behalf of the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP), NOAA and partner agencies, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the Office of Naval Research request proposals that: (1) build upon the foundation established by the US Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON), the US Animal Telemetry Network (ATN), and the US IOOS Regional Associations to work across sectors and disciplines towards an integrated, sustained marine life observing capability for the U.S. ocean, coasts and Great Lakes, from estuaries to the deep ocean; (2) advance technologies for efficient and/or automated collection of species and associated habitat observations; (3) enable open access to biodiversity data and information; and (4) utilize these observations, technologies, and data to address place-based (e.g., sanctuaries, reserves, protected areas, leasing blocks, etc) management, conservation and restoration needs. For more information and to apply: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=335886. The deadline for applications is December 17, 2021.
  • Funding Opportunity from Oregon: The Oregon Ocean Science Trust (OOST), in consultation with the Oregon Coordinating Council on Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia (OAH Council), are pleased to announce the Request For Proposals (RFP) for strategic research, monitoring, and communications to address ocean acidification and hypoxia. Subsequent to the passage of a funding bill (HB 3114) by the Oregon Legislature, the State of Oregon has provided about $1,000,000 to priority actions from the Oregon Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia Action Plan 2019-2025. Proposals are due by 21 December 2021.  To review the request for proposals, including deadlines, forms, and other information, please visit https://www.oostoahrfp.com
  • Understanding multi-stressor impacts on marine ecosystems under climate change: NOAA/NOS/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)/Competitive Research Program (CRP), the NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO), and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), in partnership with the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) and the NOAA Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), are soliciting proposals to understand the combined impacts of multiple stressors on the function and health of marine ecosystems within the context of climate change. This information will be used to improve place-based management of marine protected areas and enable the proactive protection of these critical ecosystems under future climate scenarios. Applications are due January 18, 2022.  Click here for full details and how to apply
  • Integrated Research on Coastal and Ocean Acidification and Harmful Algal Blooms: and the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) are soliciting proposals for research that must address the interaction between coastal and ocean acidification and harmful algal blooms. Funding is contingent upon the availability of Fiscal Year 2022 Federal appropriations. It is anticipated that up to approximately $1,500,000 may be available in Fiscal Year 2022 for the first year for all projects combined. If funds become available for this program, 3-5 targeted projects are expected to be funded at the level of $300,00 to $500,000 per year per proposal (including ship time). Projects are expected not to exceed 3 years in duration. NCCOS/CRP will not accept any proposals submitted with an annual budget that is greater than $500,000 for any year. It is anticipated that projects funded under this announcement will have a September 1, 2022 start date.  Applications close January 19, 2022.  View the funding opportunity here. 
  • Pacific Islands Ocean Acidification Masters Student Fellowship: The NOAA Ocean Acidification Program is supporting a competitive graduate fellowship that will support students conducting research, in pursuit of a Masters degree, related to ocean acidification in the Pacific Islands region to help fill a critical gap in capacity for OA research and monitoring in the region. OAP is seeking to fund students who would contribute to the body of knowledge on regional vulnerabilities to OA and potential solutions to build greater resilience against the impacts of OA. Successful applicants will conduct research that addresses physical/chemical oceanographic, biological, and/or socioeconomic questions and concepts. This funding call is part of a broader initiative, which involves multiple international scientific networks and capacity building organizations. Subject to the availability of funding, OAP anticipates up to $300,000 USD total will be available to support approximately 3-6 graduate fellows, with each fellow funded at the approximate level of $20,000 - $32,000 USD per year for 2 years. The closing date for applications is March 10, 2022.  View the funding opportunity here.

Job and Internship Opportunities:

  • National Ocean Service, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Navigation, Observations and Positioning: For the first time, NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) is recruiting for the position of Deputy Assistant Administrator for Navigation, Observations and Positioning to complement our existing leadership team. The DAA-NOP will have responsibility for establishing, managing, and providing strategic direction for the Navigation, Observations, and Position programs within NOS. The position is open until 12/27/2021. https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/622912000 
  • Assistant Professor – Hurricane Science Earth and Ocean Sciences, UNC Wilmington: The Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences announces a tenure-track assistant professor position in Hurricane Science and Associated Hazards to begin August 2022. We seek a natural scientist focused on tropical weather systems and their environmental impacts in the context of climate change, such as extreme precipitation and flooding, storm surge, coastal erosion, landslides, or impacts on infrastructure in populated areas. To complement our coastal plain location, preference will be given to candidates with experience analyzing Atlantic hurricanes and an appreciation for hurricane impacts on coastal and island environments. The ideal candidate will have experience teaching courses in weather and climate, a successful research record with evidence of mentoring students, and demonstrated interests in public outreach and science communication. We welcome applications from candidates who can incorporate an inclusive environmental and social justice narrative in their research and outreach activities. A PhD in the Earth and Ocean Sciences or a closely related discipline is required by the time of appointment. Closes January 4, 2022. For more information or to apply, please visit: https://jobs.uncw.edu/postings/22219
  • MTS Executive Director: Dr. Kathleen Herndon has been the MTS Executive Director for 3 years and her contract concludes in January 2022. As the Society continues to evolve, the MTS Board determined that the MTS ED needs significant marine technology experience and expertise to advance their goals.  As of 10 November they have opened up the search for the new Executive Director.  Closes January 6, 2022.  The position description and how to apply can be seen here:  https://mtsociety.memberclicks.net/assets/MTS%20POSITION%20DESCRIPTION_final2021.pdf
  • Post Doctoral Associate in acoustic tracking research, University of Miami: The successful candidate will work on a collaborative IOOS/SECOORA-funded project to integrate acoustic animal tracking data into biodiversity monitoring and conservation. The project will support a growing initiative between the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) and Animal Telemetry Network (ATN) to integrate, store, process, visualize and share data on marine biodiversity hotspots based on animal tracking data that is useful for conservation and natural resource management. The researcher will be mentored by Dr. Neil Hammerschlag (University of Miami) and will benefit from collaborations among the animal tracking community, MBON investigators, and ATN staff. The candidate will also be welcomed as a core team member of the Shark Research and Conservation Program and Hammerschlag Laboratory at the University of Miami. Open until filled. Click here for more info and how to apply.
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow in bioinformatics and machine learning, Loyola Marymount University: A Postdoctoral Research Fellow position is available immediately with Demian Willette (Loyola Marymount University), in collaboration with Michael Vecchione (National Museum of Natural History) and Amina Jackson (Booz Allen). The postdoc will be based in the Vecchione Lab at the NMNH, Washington D.C. This position is part of a National Science Foundation Convergence Accelerator project aimed at developing use-inspired solutions to societal challenges in ocean-related resources. For more information please reach out to project PI Dr. Demian Willette at demian.willette@lmu.edu

Click here to view the IOOS Association Calendar

Do you have suggestions for new things you would like to see in the Eyes on the Ocean IOOS Bi-Weekly? Contact us at: eoto@noaa.gov.

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